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12 Great Grains

by: Lutongbahay.com
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 If you think that rice is rice, you don't know beans about this family of great grains.


Colored rices.

1. Himalayan red.
Salmon pink when cooked, this is one of the more flavorful of the colored rices with a taste similar to wheat or nuts. Its chewy texture serves as a good counterpoint to stir-fries. Available: Asian, Indian groceries; health food and gourmet stores.

2. Chinese black.
Turns a very dark, almost indigo color after cooking with a slightly nutty flavor and a pleasant, almost floral aftertaste. Serve as a side dish as you would brown rice, or in such mixtures as stuffings and puddings. Available: Asian and Indian groceries; health food and gourmet stores.

3. Colusari red.
This chewy rice has a light nutty-popcorn-like flavor. It works well as a side dish and in salads and stuffings.

4. Black Japonica.
This rice has a chewier texture than other rices and a starchy flavor that works well as a side dish and in salads and stuffings. It combines well with other rices. Available: health food and gourmet stores; larger supermarkets.

5. Purple Thai.
Also called Purple Thai Sticky Rice, this is a flavorful rice with a faintly fruity taste, though not sweet. Used for rice pudding, but also delicious in savory dishes, such as salads. Available: Asian and Indian groceries; health food and gourmet stores.


Short and medium-grain rices.

6. Short-grain.
The rice to use when you prefer a stickier texture and a softer grain after cooking. It pairs well with many Asian dishes and is used in dishes such as paella and risotto. Available: larger supermarkets; gourmet stores; Italian markets. One popular type of short-grain rice is Arborio. Grown in both America and Italy, it is sometimes labeled Risotto Rice and is most often used in the Italian rice dish called risotto. When cooked, Arborio rice produces a slightly chewy, creamy exterior that is firm to the bite. Available: supermarkets; Italian groceries; gourmet and health food stores.

7. Medium-grain.
A slightly sticky rice that cooks up tender and plump with a neutral taste. Use it in desserts, pancakes, risotto, or paella. Available: supermarkets.


Brown rices.

8. Brown.
With its nutty taste and chewy texture, this unpolished rice tastes best when paired with strong seasonings and sauces. Available: supermarkets.

9. Brown and wild rice mix.
The strong, nutty taste of wild rice (which is actually a long-grain marsh grass native to the U.S.) is mellowed when paired with brown rice. Use it as a side dish for boldly flavored meats. Available: supermarkets.


Long-grain rices.

10. Jasmine.
This rice has a mild popcorn aroma. Grains swell lengthwise only; they don't plump up. Jasmine rice is soft and slightly sticky. Use as an accompaniment to stir-fry dishes. Available: larger supermarkets; Asian and Indian groceries; health food and gourmet stores.

11. Basmati.
Like jasmine rice, this has a popcorn aroma. When cooked, its long grains separate well. This is an excellent rice to pair with stir-fry dishes and other Asian-inspired meals. Available: larger supermarkets; Asian and Indian groceries; health food and gourmet stores.

12. Long-grain.
About three-quarters of the rice consumed in America is long grain. This rice's neutral taste and firm texture make it a perfect side dish with almost anything. When cooked, grains remain separate and fluffy. Available: supermarkets.


Cooking Tips:
There's no trick to making good rice time after time; it's a matter of measuring carefully and paying attention to timing.

To make white rice, bring 2 cups of water to boiling. Slowly stir in 1 cup uncooked long-grain white rice. Return to boiling. Reduce heat to medium-low. (Rice should be barely simmering.) Simmer covered, 15 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat; let stand, covered, 5 minutes. Makes 3 cups of rice.

To make brown rice, bring 2 cups of water to boiling and add 1 cup uncooked brown rice. Return to boiling. Reduce heat to medium-low. (Rice should be barely simmering.) Simmer, covered, about 35 minutes. Remove from heat; let stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Makes 3 cups rice.


What to do with leftover rice.
To save time later, cook extra rice and save it. Simply store cooked rice in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to 1 week or in the freezer for up to 6 months.

To reheat chilled or frozen rice, in a saucepan add 2 tablespoons water or broth for each cup of rice. Cover and heat on top of the range about 5 minutes or until the rice is heated through.

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April 19, 2014

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